Walsh Construction erects a tower crane at Salesforce Tower (Wolf Point South)

Shoutouts:

Design Architect: Pelli Clarke Pelli

General Contractor: Walsh Construction 

Developer: Hines 

 

 

Catching up on Wolf Point East

Screen grab from the OxBlue construction cam at Wolf Point East.

This is embarrassing.

How many times have I walked by, and stopped at, the Wolf Point East construction site? If you guessed between 6,000 and 74 gazillion, you’re close. So how had I not figured out there was an OxBlue webcam aimed at the now-topped-off-and-craneless tower this whole time?

Wolf Point East, of course, is the second of three towers being built at the northeast corner of the Chicago River Triangle, if indeed a triangle can have a northwest corner. Developed by Hines in cooperation with the Kennedy family, Wolf Point East is bringing 700 rental units to the River North neighborhood. The 60-story tower will also include 200 parking spaces and 3,600 square feet of retail space.

Pelli Calrke Pelli is the design architect; Pappageorge Haymes Partners is the architect of record. That’s The Big Green W out there on the build. (Remember the trestle bridge?!)

Sorry, January 26, 2020 was a very grey day:

The Orchard is growing condos at The Lincoln Common

This ridiculous sunrise shot from the tower crane, from Gilbane Building Company, taken at The Orchard.

Located next to the recently-opened matching towers of The Lincoln Common, The Orchard is a seven-story, 32-unit condominium building on the rise in Lincoln Park. There are two developers: McCaffery Interests and Hines. The design architect is Antunovich Associates. Gilbane Building Company is the general contractor.

The condo building has reached its final height of seven floors. There’s still a lot of exterior work to be done, and then there’s the matter of getting 32 condominiums move-in ready. The Orchard is on track to open later this year.

 

 

Stuff That’s Done: The Apartments at Lincoln Common

The two apartment towers that anchor the new Lincoln Common development in Lincoln Park opened to residents in Spring 2019. The Apartments at Lincoln Common fill the pair of 20-story towers with 538 apartments, featuring studio, one-bed, two-bed, and three-bedroom units.

The sprawling complex is built on the grounds of the former Children’s Memorial Hospital, which was demolished after the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago was constructed in Streeterville. Children’s patients were moved there in the spring of 2012.

This phase of The Lincoln Common could have been called Noahville, because everything about this project came in pairs:

There are the two towers.

The two towers were erected by two tower cranes.

There are two developers: Hines and McCaffery Interests.

There are two design architects: Antunovich Associates and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.

Alas, there only needed to be one general contractor in charge of putting it all together; W.E. O’Neil filled those duties.

Included in the photo gallery below are a couple more pieces of the Lincoln Common puzzle:

  • A five-story boutique office building at 2350 N Lincoln.
  • A row of single-story retail spaces from 2316-2348 N Lincoln
  • The renovated “power station” buildings at 2355 N Lincoln
  • A new Chase Bank in the recreated building at 2377 N Lincoln

Updates to come: The Orchard, a seven-story condominium building currently under construction, and Belmont Village Senior Living, a completed seven-story residential facility at 700 West Fullerton.

Congratulations to all involved in the ongoing establishment of a great new neighborhood on Chicago’s north side.

 

 

I’ve missed a lot

Took a train downtown this evening. Even lugged the tripod along with me, since it’s been almost forever since I’ve tried to take a night shot. And discovered that what little I knew about taking photographs, I’ve mostly forgotten. Couldn’t even tell that most of the shots were badly out of focus. Oh well.

Here’s one of Wolf Point East, Merchandise Mart (during Art on the Mart), and whatever that kite/hammock contraption is along the Riverwalk.

Wolf Point East

Prepare to be shocked: I went to Wolf Point East again

Wolf Point East June 2018

June 6, 2018: The City of Chicago was kind enough to raise half of the Lake Street Bridge so I could get a good view of Wolf Point East.

It was there, so I stopped. Sue me.

The two towers of The Lincoln Common continue their race to the top

The Lincoln Common June 2018

The Lincoln Common’s two towers near topping out in Lincoln Park.

If my math is correct, I see towers of 18 and 19 stories at The Lincoln Common. Both those numbers are very close to 20, which is what we were expecting on the former Children’s Memorial Hospital site in Lincoln Park.

And it’s not just those two towers W.E. O’Neil is hard at work constructing. Belmont Village across Fullerton has started shooting upwards, 2380 North Lincoln (the old White Elephant shop) is getting some much-needed attention (finally!) and the six-story retail & office building at 2350 North Lincoln has risen fast. Heck, even the parking garage next to that is having work done. These are a busy couple of blocks in Lincoln Park.

A not-sunny-at-all day at an abandoned Wolf Point East

Wolf Point East May 2018

An idle day at Wolf Point East.

Not Spire-abandoned, of course. But rainy-and-it’s-Saturday-so-there’s-no-good-reason-to-go-to-the-site abandoned. This was Wolf Point East over the weekend, when it was chilly, gloomy, and empty.

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The Pickard Chilton Boathouse we didn’t get

Pickard Chilton Boathouse

Rendering from Pickard Chilton of a proposed boathouse at River Point.

An innocent Wednesday-morning tweet led me down a rabbit hole, and I eventually climbed out through the website of Pickard Chilton, the New Haven, Connecticut-based architecture firm known in Chicago for designing River Point and 300 North LaSalle, plus one of my out-of-town favorites, the Northwestern Mutual Tower in Milwaukee.

One item on the Pickard Chilton projects page in particular caught my attention; The Boathouse. A proposed development for Hines, The Boathouse was designed to go where River Point Plaza stands now. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not at all unhappy with either River Point or its plaza, but this boathouse would have been an awesome addition to the Chicago River. Maybe another location? It could look marvelous down on the South Branch too.

All of the following images of The Boathouse are from Pickard Chilton.

River Point Plaza

River Point Plaza, where The Boathouse would have been built. (B.U.C. image)