Wynyard Place greets Sydney visitors with a tower crane trifecta

Wynyard Place Sydney

Look up! These 3 tower cranes greet you from Wynyard Place when you step out of the Carrington Street exit of Wynyard Station.

You know you’re going to enjoy Sydney when you jump on a train at the airport, riding past Sydney Harbour and the Opera House, to Wynyard Station in the CBD, and the first thing you see when you walk out into the light of day are three tower cranes.

Wynyard Place Shell House

Shell House

Those three cranes belong to Wynyard Place, a multi-faceted renovation and new-construction project from Brookfield. Also known as Brookfield Multiplex. And we’re very familiar with Multiplex and their multicranes at projects like Jewel Residences, Collins Arch, and Swanston Central.

The centerpiece of Wynyard Place will be a 27-story, Make Architects-designed office tower being built on the site of the former Menzies Hotel, now being demolished, at 10 Carrington Street. Also included in the project are the renovations of 285 George Street, and Shell House.

Shell House (yes, the oil company) is notable for the clock on top, and the large SHELL lettering along the side. The 12-story Shell House was built by Shell Oil as an office building, was converted to a hotel as part of Menzies, and is now being renovated back into 7,700 square meters of office space.

285 George Street, according to Commercial Real Estate, also goes by the name “Beneficial House,” and used to be the home of menswear store “Peapes.” Peapes signage has been revealed during demolition, just like the Shell sign.

Both buildings being renovated, Shell House and 285 George Street, currently feature tower cranes growing out of their roofs. I can’t say I’ve ever seen, or at least noticed, that before.

All three buildings will combine for nearly 70,000 square meters of office space and 6,700 square meters of retail, plus room for parking 80 cars. Completion of Wynyard Place is expected in 2020.

Mild-mannered demolition site could soon be a Meriton Supertall in Gold Coast, QLD

Meriton is a brand I didn’t know until our Australia trip. We saw a few properties in Sydney, spent a night in one Meriton serviced apartment and gawked at their 2nd Brisbane skyscraper, then noticed yet another from our rooftop deck in Gold Coast. Finally, a casual stroll through Surfers Paradise revealed what remains of an almost-completed 22-story demolition (of the former International Beach Resort) that may just turn out to be the most impressive Meriton tower yet.

Meriton Surfers Paradise demolition

This rendering appeared in the Gold Coast Bulletin.

Over the past 12 months, since Meriton bought the property at 84 Esplanade, multiple outlets including the Gold Coast Bulletin, Brisbane Development, the Australian Financial Review, Ray White Surfers Paradise, and Meriton itself (that’s a lot of sources) are reporting that Meriton will build a tower of at least 90 stories in height. That could make it the tallest in Gold Coast, the tallest in Queensland, and even the tallest in all of Australia, depending on how high it goes.

Meriton Suites Surfers Paradise would contain 311 suites on floors 3-30, with the upper floors being for-purchase units. That link says it would be open in 2018; with demolition still underway, that seems optimistic, but we’ll see.

The consensus seems to be that SJB designed the would-be supertall.

For now though, it’s still this modest-looking demo job.

 

Subtraction before addition for Sydney’s Greenland Centre

Greenland Centre Sydney

This is the end of the beginning of a new 66-story residential tower, Greenland Centre Sydney.

You all know me by now. I brake for tower cranes. Not only do I still get giddy when I see them, but now and then, they leave me staring in disbelief. These are two such cranes.

In Sydney’s Central Business District, Greenland Central Sydney is starting with demolition, but not total destruction. The 26-story former HQ building for Sydney Water on Bathurst Street was stripped of everything but the iron frame, which now stands alone — along with those two tower cranes — in the sky. Demolition wrapped up in July, and Probuild began the process of turning that steel cage into a 66-story residential tower, making it the tallest residential tower in Sydney at about 770 feet.

A project by China-based developer Greenland Group, and designed by BVN with executive architect Woods Bagot, Greenland Centre will contain nearly 500 one-, two-, and three-bedroom luxury apartments. Construction is expected to take another two+ years, with opening slated for 2020. But admit it; you’d kinda like to see it remain a bare-steel frame.

Heneghan Wrecking is tearing out concrete slabs at the old Finkl Steel site

Sterling Bay Finkl Steel site

Heneghan Wrecking is tearing up and hauling off the concrete slabs that remain at the old Finkl Steel site.

This blog has no inside information on what exactly Sterling Bay has in store for its recently-purchased* Finkl Steel site. But we’re heartened by activity, as Heneghan Wrecking is back on site, removing the concrete slabs from the empty lots, virtually all that remains of the once-mighty steel yard.

DNAInfo? That’s another story. They *do* have some inkling of what could be coming, and they posted about it back in July here.

*While still at Crain’s, Ryan Ori reported on the Finkl site deal late in 2016. And then the Chicago Tribune’s Ryan Ori reported in July about Sterling Bay adding even more land to its portfolio.

Whatever is coming, it can’t get started without wiping the slate clean of the Finkl remnants. That’s what Heneghan is up to. Does it mean new construction is imminent? That remains to be seen. But we can hope.

 

Our robot demolition overlords are tearing apart 1450 North Dayton

The robots are on their way, and they’re coming after our infrastructure.

Along the emerging Clybourn Corridor in the Goose Island neighborhood, Alpine Demolition (KnockItDown.com — I like it) is knocking down the 3-story brick building at 1450 North Dayton Street. Curbed had the story back in August about the planned demolition.

In its place will be a mixed-use building of office and retail space called, for now, the Big Deahl at Kingsbury and Blackhawk. If that name doesn’t make immediate sense, know that Kingsbury runs past the rear of the site, and to its north. Danny Ecker at Crain’s had the story about the new development last month.

1450 North Dayton demolition

DO NOT LOOK THE DEMO DEMON IN THE EYE.

 

But I want to talk about that demolition robot. Those two bright eyes look like they could pierce masonry, let alone the built-in jackhammer. If these aren’t readily available to the public, maybe Alpine will let me control theirs for awhile.

As Old Town Park rises, more of Atrium Village comes down

Old Town Park at Atrium Village

Old Town Park rises beyond the rubble of Atrium Village.

The circle of life continues at Atrium Village, as all but the 207 units of 300 West Hill Street have now been reduced to rubble, even as Old Town Park rises on the northeast corner of the development. The first of tower in the rebuilding of the development, Old Town Park has reached the 21st of its ultimate 32 stories. Onni Group, the developer and general contractor, is flying along at better than a one-floor-per-week pace.

Meanwhile, demolition is all but complete, with only rubble to remove, on the remaining buildings of the complex, save for the previously mentioned 300 West Hill, which is staying. **Serious question: At what point will everyone look around at all the new, amenity-laden buildings, look back at this old one, and say “yeah, let’s tear it down after all”? Anyway, the slate will be clean in plenty of time to begin work on the second tower, hopefully in early fall.

Old Town Park at Atrium Village

This overhead shot from Curtis Waltz at Aerialscapes shows the Old Town Park tower, with Atrium Village demolition at lower left.

Demolition permit at 4646 North Damen Avenue clearing the way for a new TOD?

4646 North Damen Avenue

As you can see in this photo from the Damen Brown Line platform, 4646 North Damen Avenue is very close to the Damen Brown Line platform.

A demolition permit issued Tuesday by the City of Chicago for the property at 4646 North Damen Avenue in Ravenswood may be the sign of a new Transit Oriented Development.

Chicago Cityscape had the story (with help from Eric Rojas) back in February. Drawings on the 47th Ward website show a 4-story, 9-unit building with ground-level retail space.

If you’re not familiar with the TOD, know that the basic criteria is to be in close proximity to a CTA L or Metra stop. 4646 North Damen is within roughly 30 feet of the Damen Brown Line, so yeah, it qualifies.

4646 North Damen Avenue

4646 North Damen Avenue. I use this station 10 times each week. I’ve been watching for this one. 

4646 North Damen Avenue

The Demo Permit

4646 North Damen Avenue