With site cleared, St. Ignatius can begin its new athletic center

St. Ignatius College Prep Athletic Center

1001 West Roosevelt, site of the new St. Ignatius College Prep Athletic Center, seen from Skydeck Chicago.

At the corner of West Roosevelt Road and South Morgan Street, Heneghan Wrecking has hauled off the last remnants of the former Provision Theater, making space for St. Ignatius College Prep to get started on its new athletic center.

Permitted for demolition on March 13, the site at 1001 West Roosevelt is a blank canvas now. Not much information is available yet for the new facility, but the coveted building permit will spill all the secrets as soon as it’s issued, likely in the very near future.

 

 

Demolition tears up 1133 West Randolph Street in the West Loop

1133 West Randolph

This is what 1133 West Randolph used to look like. Now, it’s being mashed like a Hot Potato.

You may have heard this already, somewhere, and likely from a reliable source, but property in the West Loop/Fulton Market District is a hot commodity. Chances are, by the time you get your table at Au Cheval, another deal has been made and another building is being decimated to make room for new development.

1132 West Randolph

1132 West Randolph, demolished Winter 2016.

And no properties have been hotter than those that used to be Hot Potato Distributors. Once a presence on both sides of West Randolph Street, the south side buildings at 1133 and 1139 are in the process of being demolished as we speak. 1132-36 was demoed in 2016, and is now an ugly vacant lot.

According to the demolition permits (and the sign on the fence) 1133 is being developed by the DiCosola Group of South Canalport. Demolition is being done by a “Viewpoint Services.”

Demolition Update: Grant Park Packing gives way to the Hoxton Chicago

Tuesday morning:

Monday morning (with sunshine):

Hoxton Chicago will begin where Grant Park Packing ends

At 832 West Lake Street in the West Loop, a crew from Heneghan Wrecking has begun making space for the new Hoxton Chicago hotel. Work started Monday (the demolition permit was issued way back in December) on the old meat-packing facility, and the slo-mo video above, courtesy of a CTA Green Line train, shows progress on tearing apart the upper level.

As reported in January, the Hoxton Chicago will be a 175-room boutique hotel from London-based developer of the Hoxton brand, Ennismore, and West Loop stalwart Shapack Partners. Chicago’s very own GREC Architects took care of the design. We may have to wait for the new building permits before we know who the general contractor will be.

 

 

It’s an Old Town Teardown as O’Brien’s meets the wrecking claw

O'Brien's 1528 North Wells Street

When this shows up at your table, you better hurry and clean your plate.

Tuesday was Last Call at O’Brien’s Restaurant at 1528 North Wells Street in Old Town, as a crew from Heneghan Wrecking went about making space for a future hotel on the site. Permitted for demolition in March, O’Brien’s closed in late August, but plan to be back in business as part of the new boutique hotel slated for the site. That hotel, approved by the Chicago Plan Commission in June 2016, will be 13 stories high with 188 guest rooms, and, teamed with four single-family homes, will include demolition of the building next door, at 1520 North Wells.

Rubble marks the spot where Rush has demolished former student-housing buildings

Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t go visit properties permitted for demolition, you could miss them.

February 27 saw a total of 13 demolition permits issued for buildings owned by Rush University Medical Center that had been previously used to house students. The buildings, all on the north side of the street in the 1400 and 1500 blocks of West Harrison Street, were soon torn into by Brandenburg Industrial Service. Sure, I may have looked out the window a time or two in that direction, but a real visit this past weekend yielded nothing but rubble.

According to a story in Crain’s Chicago Business back in 2015, Rush has plans for a 9-story, 620,000-square-foot outpatient center on the site. But of course those plans could have changed in the year-and-a-half interim.

Of note in the midst of the rubble is one building that remains at the east end of the demolition area, still standing, yet surrounded by construction fence. Air conditioners galore make it look lived-in, but with all those barriers, that doesn’t seem possible. But will that structure remain?