With site cleared, St. Ignatius can begin its new athletic center

St. Ignatius College Prep Athletic Center

1001 West Roosevelt, site of the new St. Ignatius College Prep Athletic Center, seen from Skydeck Chicago.

At the corner of West Roosevelt Road and South Morgan Street, Heneghan Wrecking has hauled off the last remnants of the former Provision Theater, making space for St. Ignatius College Prep to get started on its new athletic center.

Permitted for demolition on March 13, the site at 1001 West Roosevelt is a blank canvas now. Not much information is available yet for the new facility, but the coveted building permit will spill all the secrets as soon as it’s issued, likely in the very near future.

 

 

Demolition tears up 1133 West Randolph Street in the West Loop

1133 West Randolph

This is what 1133 West Randolph used to look like. Now, it’s being mashed like a Hot Potato.

You may have heard this already, somewhere, and likely from a reliable source, but property in the West Loop/Fulton Market District is a hot commodity. Chances are, by the time you get your table at Au Cheval, another deal has been made and another building is being decimated to make room for new development.

1132 West Randolph

1132 West Randolph, demolished Winter 2016.

And no properties have been hotter than those that used to be Hot Potato Distributors. Once a presence on both sides of West Randolph Street, the south side buildings at 1133 and 1139 are in the process of being demolished as we speak. 1132-36 was demoed in 2016, and is now an ugly vacant lot.

According to the demolition permits (and the sign on the fence) 1133 is being developed by the DiCosola Group of South Canalport. Demolition is being done by a “Viewpoint Services.”

It’s an Old Town Teardown as O’Brien’s meets the wrecking claw

O'Brien's 1528 North Wells Street

When this shows up at your table, you better hurry and clean your plate.

Tuesday was Last Call at O’Brien’s Restaurant at 1528 North Wells Street in Old Town, as a crew from Heneghan Wrecking¬†went about making space for a future hotel on the site. Permitted for demolition in March, O’Brien’s closed in late August, but plan to be back in business as part of the new boutique hotel slated for the site. That hotel, approved by the Chicago Plan Commission in June 2016, will be 13 stories high with 188 guest rooms, and, teamed with four single-family homes, will include demolition of the building next door, at 1520 North Wells.

One final fade to black for the Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion

Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion

The former Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion is a sandlot.

The Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion, which stood at 700 West Fullerton Parkway as part of the old Children’s Memorial Hospital for roughly eight decades, is now an empty lot awaiting its next life. The handsome 7-story brick edifice is a distant memory now, to be replaced by a handsome 7-story brick senior-living edifice.

Old parking garage is more Ex than Ess, clearing space for Essex On The Park

Essex On The Park demo

The parking deck, including a pool, next to the Essex Inn is coming down to make room for Essex On The Park. So please, NO DIVING.

While the Essex Inn at 800 North Michigan Avenue gets a complete upgrade, its parking deck, pool, and ground-floor restaurant next door are being obliterated by Heneghan Wrecking, making space for Essex On The Park, the giant 56-story apartment tower from Oxford Capital Group. The shiny, 476-unit project by Hartshorne Plunkard Architects will be some kind of addition to the Michigan Avenue streetwall, what with its short, stocky hotels. Power Construction is the general contractor, tasked with having the apartments ready for habitation next year.

Another day, another hospital demolition: The obliteration of Cuneo Hospital

Montrose and Clarendon

Cuneo Hospital gives way to the Montrose and Clarendon Development.

There are big plans for the intersection of Montrose and Clarendon Avenues in Uptown. And as is often the case, big plans to build first mean big plans to demolish.

And so it goes for the former Cuneo Hospital, and later the Maryville children’s shelter, buildings. Empty since 2005 (“it looks like a science experiment in there. Plants, moss, all kinds of things growing” I was told by a passing explorer) the old buildings had fallen into disrepair. So down they come. American Demolition is out there doing the dirty work.

Taking Cuneo’s place will be a joint venture from JDL Development and Harlem Irving Companies.¬†Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture is the designer.