The Lincoln Common scores a permit

The Lincoln Common

The farmland that used to be Children’s Memorial Hospital will soon be transformed into the Lincoln Common.

The Lincoln Common project is ready to roll onto the site formerly occupied by Children’s Memorial Hospital in Lincoln Park.

The first permit, issued Wednesday, calls for a 20-story mixed-use tower, with 269 dwelling units and ZERO parking spaces. A collaboration between Hines and McCaffery Interests, The Lincoln Common also combines the talents of two design firms: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, and Antunovich Associates. W.E. O’Neil will be the general contractor.

A rendering of The Lincoln Common from Antunovich Associates.

A rendering of The Lincoln Common from Antunovich Associates.

The Lincoln Common.

The foundation permit.

The Lincoln Common

Will that ugly parking garage go too?

One final fade to black for the Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion

Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion

The former Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion is a sandlot.

The Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion, which stood at 700 West Fullerton Parkway as part of the old Children’s Memorial Hospital for roughly eight decades, is now an empty lot awaiting its next life. The handsome 7-story brick edifice is a distant memory now, to be replaced by a handsome 7-story brick senior-living edifice.

That’s a wrap on Children’s Memorial Hospital, which is now a scrapyard

Piles of dirt. Sorted pieces of scrap metal heaped together. A few pits and ditches. ‘Tis all that remains.

The former Children’s Memorial Hospital in Lincoln Park is little more than an empty lot now, as Omega Demolition finishes up work on the triangular site. Soon, construction on The Lincoln Common will commence.

Demolitions continue around the old Children’s Memorial Hospital

Remnants of the White Elephant Resale Shop at 2375 North Lincoln Avenue.

Remnants of the White Elephant Resale Shop at 2375 North Lincoln Avenue.

It isn’t just Children’s Memorial Hospital being erased from Lincoln Park memory. Adjacent buildings on Lincoln Avenue and Fullerton Parkway have also been doomed to the wrecking ball as well, in addition to a couple structures within the triangular block where the hospital stood. Those include the Martha Wilson Memorial Pavilion at 701 West Fullerton, and what you may have known as the White Elephant Resale Shop at 2375 North Lincoln.

A Hines McCaffery Interests rendering, which seems to show the White Elephant building remaining.

A Hines McCaffery Interests rendering, which seems to show the White Elephant building remaining.

You aren’t alone if you thought the White Elephant building was to be saved. Renderings of The Lincoln Common show the building in place, so many of us were thrown off by its demise. According to DNAInfo, it was to be saved, or reconstructed, or maybe it will still be recreated as a brand-new structure. Whichever way, it’s rubble now. As for the Wilson Pavilion, that’s nothing but a hole in the earth now.

 

 

Children's Memorial Hospital demolitions

2350 and 2356 North Lincoln Avenue, prior to demolition. They’re both gone now.

Over on Lincoln Avenue, 2350 and 2356 were permitted for demolition in September, and 2358 a partial demolition, with the Lincoln Avenue facade to be saved, in early October. The former two structures are gone. 2358, of course, will take more time and care to bring down.

 

 

 

Finally, the Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion, at 700 West Fullerton, built in the late 1920s according to Preservation Chicago, which American Demolition started tearing into last month. Unrelated to The Lincoln Common, to will be replaced by a similarly-styled 7-story brick building to be used as a senior living facility.

Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion

The Nellie A. Black Memorial Pavilion demolition is underway.

 

 

 

Two more buildings added to Lincoln Common demolition plan

Lincoln Common demolition

2350 and 2356 North Lincoln Avenue, permitted for demolition to make room for Lincoln Common.

They don’t carry quite the glamour Children’s Memorial Hospital has garnered during demolition, but two more buildings along North Lincoln Avenue were slated for destruction last week, as the Lincoln Common project moves along in Lincoln Park.

The pair being torn down next are 2350 and 2356 North Lincoln. The City of Chicago filed demolition permits for each structure on September 28. McDonagh Demolition will do the honors, according to those permits.

 

As Children’s Hospital disappears, are the rats appearing?

Children's Memorial Hospital demolition

No rats visible in this view of Children’s Memorial Hospital demolition, from atop the John Hancock Center.

Back in the spring, everyone (Crain’s, Trib, DNAInfo, to name a few) with access to a pen and paper wrote of the impending influx of rats in the Lincoln Park neighborhood once demolition of Children’s Memorial Hospital began.

Well, demolition is in full swing, and it occurs to me I haven’t heard anything at all about rats over the past couple months. So, to you, denizens of Lincoln Park, I ask: Are you seeing more rats, or signs of more rats, than you’d seen before demolition began?

This is what comment sections are for; sound off!

 

Demolition Update: Children’s Memorial Hospital

Children's Memorial Hospital demolition

Children’s Memorial Hospital demolition, as seen from atop the John Hancock Center.

The coolest place to see Children’s Memorial Hospital demolition? At 360 Chicago atop the John Hancock Center. The best place to watch Children’s Memorial Hospital demolition? On the sidewalks along Lincoln Avenue and Orchard Street. And soon, Fullerton Street too.

Demo crews from Omega Demolition have wiped out the corner of Lincoln and Orchard, and are moving their way north toward the tower portion of the former hospital. It’s fun to watch buildings being torn down, especially, as I’ve mentioned before, when they’ve already been replaced by newer facilities.

Demolition Update: Children’s Memorial Hospital

Children's Memorial Hospital demolition

Looking down Lincoln Avenue from Halsted Street, demolition of Children’s Memorial Hospital is hard to miss.

Demolition of the old Children’s Memorial Hospital in Lincoln Park continues at the hands of Omega Demolition crews. They set about the task of tearing the place down on June 7, and have been at it since. And will be for quite some time.

In its place will be The Lincoln Common, a venture from Hines and McCaffery Interests. Planned are two luxury apartment towers boasting 540 dwelling units, 60 low-rise condos, and over 100,000 square feet of retail space, designed by Antunovich Associates in collaboration with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.

Here’s another round of photos.

 

Children’s Memorial Hospital Being Reduced to Scrap

Children's Memorial Hospital

Piles of scrap are growing on the Children’s Memorial Hospital site. Do Not Enter. Says so right on the sign. 

You already know about the demolition of Children’s Memorial Hospital in Lincoln Park, and the development that will take its place at North Lincoln and West Fullerton.

Fewer words, more pictures. That’s what you came here for.

 

 

Demolition, Man! Old Malcolm X College Meets The Wrecking Ball

Malcolm X College

Demolition continues at the old Malcolm X College. How many students passed through these doors over the years?

The saddest demolitions occur when a building needs to come down without a replacement. A church burns, and a congregation has no meeting place. A hospital is torn down, and patients have no where to turn for care. A school is leveled, and students have to be bused for miles to finish their education.

Two current, high-profile demos in Chicago are fortunate in that sense. I stopped by the old Children’s Memorial Hospital this week, for its first day of destruction. The old facility has been closed for four years now, after the new Lurie Children’s Hospital was constructed in Streeterville and all patients were transferred without interruption of care.

Such is the case with the old Malcolm X College demolition as well. A brand new facility opened at 1900 West Jackson Boulevard for the 2016 school year, leaving the old school across the street empty. So Heneghan Wrecking started tearing it down this spring. Will something take it’s place? Of course, and I’m gonna let the Chicago Blackhawks tell you all about it. That way, I have more room for photos.