Sterling Bay breaks ground on newly-permitted 225 North Elizabeth

Early this week, Sterling Bay broke ground on their latest residential project, then began tearing away at the concrete slabs that stand in its way, while also celebrating the caisson permit issued by the city on Tuesday.

225 North Elizabeth, in their own words, will be:

a 28-story mixed-use tower in Fulton Market featuring 350 modern residential units and approximately 10,000 square feet of ground floor retail. The building, which is designed to complement the industrial character of the neighborhood, will set a new standard for urban living in what has been named “the fastest growing submarket in the country”. Featuring residential amenities including two green rooftop spaces to connect tenants to the outdoors, indoor/outdoor fitness and pet suite facilities, as well as shared indoor work-life spaces to meet the growing demand for work-from-home accommodations, 225 N Elizabeth is where form meets function in Fulton Market.

Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture is the design architect. McHugh Construction is the general contractor, with McHugh Concrete doing the concrete work. That’s Lindahl Brothers out there having at the concrete.

Love seeing the height of the West Loop moving further west.

Disappearing this gigantic concrete slab was the first order of business at 225 North Elizabeth.

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920 North Wells is *Flying*

I took these photos on Wednesday last week. At the rate it’s going, 920 North Wells might be done by now. AT the very least, there’s likely another full floor done.

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North Union II/III get started at 868 North Wells

One of the first caissons for 868 North Wells at North Union.

One day after getting a foundation permit for the next two buildings at North Union, crews were drilling holes in the earth and filling them with concrete at 868 North Wells Street in Near North.

That single permit issued Tuesday allows Power Construction and Keller North America to work on two structures here: a 27-story residential tower with 411 units, and a five-story building with 23 units. (JDL Development shows a 25-story tower, so we’ll assume the two extra floors are the two below-grade parking levels mentioned in the permit, which includes 129 spaces. They also show 428 units instead of 411; we’ll just wait and see how many there will be when the dust settles and the appliances are installed.)

As they were for North Union’s first tower, a block north at 920 North Wells, Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture is the design architect. McHugh Concrete joins the team as concrete contractor.

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Going up, and going, going, gone — 920 and 868 North Wells at North Union

868 North Wells has been reduced to rubble, while 920 North Wells has produced up to the fifth-floor slab, at JDL Development’s sprawling North Union project.

Here are the pics from last week (they could well be on the sixth floor by now):

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1020 West Randolph has topped out in Chicago’s West Loop

The W.E. O’Neil drone (top left) and I at 1020 West Randolph last week.

W.E. O’Neil announced last week they have topped out 1020 West Randolph, the five-story boutique office building in the West Loop. Developed by L3 Capital and RL Edward Partners, and designed by Hartshorne Plunkard Architects, 1020 West Randolph will include 23,000 square feet of office space and 5,000 square feet of retail space. By the looks of the rooftop terrace rendering, I’m going to need to finesse an invite up there once the space is open.

I last (and first) posted about 1020 back in April. And I would understand if you’d assumed I hadn’t stopped by since. But I have, and I humbly apologize to the 1020 West Randolph team for letting photos grow stale on my laptop. So I’ll post them all now, from the old bank building that was demolished, to a visit last week when a drone and I (*a* drone, not *my* drone) were around to see the structure rise to full height. But with newer photos first.

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920 North Wells rises above street level as demolition continues for North Union next door

The North Union megadevelopment from JDL Development is now evidenced in two locations. 920 North Wells, the first building to get started, has risen above street level. At 868 North Wells one block to the south, demolition is underway to clear space for another residential tower. 868 will be a 25-story building with 428 units and 12,000 square feet of retail space.

The most fun thing about this is you get two galleries; one for 920 construction by Power Construction, and one for 868 demolition by Atlas Industries. It’s like getting extra free stuff with the free stuff you already got.

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The first of many North Union tower cranes is up at 920 North Wells

Not only is the tower crane up at 920 North Wells, but there’s construction fencing up in the next block south on Wells Street. Call it 868 North Wells or 210 West Chestnut, but you better call it soon, because that fence means demolition is imminent for the former Irwin A Moon building on the Moody Bible Institute campus. Demolishing it will make room for 878 North Wells, the 25-story, 428-unit second tower on JDL Development’s North Union agenda. All we need do now is watch for the demo permit.

Tower crane enthusiasts are salivating.

Today’s gallery is a two-fer. You get to see 920’s brand-spankin’-new tower crane, and you get a few shots thrown in of 868 before its demise. Sorry I wasn’t patient enough to wait for the sun to show up. Enjoy.


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920 North Wells, in serious Not Messing Around mode, plants a tower crane

The way 920 North Wells keeps crashing through milestones, I’m worried if I blink, it’ll be done. It’s latest trick is planting the tower crane stub, which was permitted May 17. Keep an eye out, as it’s likely, the way things are going, for the tower crane to be completely erected by the end of this week.

In the meantime, have a whole mess o’ photos of a tower crane base at a construction site. (iPhones come in handy for peeking over fences)

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Solar Junkyard wins approval for 33-story West Loop apartment tower

Solar Junkyard can build their 33-story, 204-unit apartment tower in the West Loop/Fulton Market area. So says the Chicago Plan Commission, which approved the Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture-designed proposal during Thursday’s meeting. What’s significant about this is that Solar Junkyard might be the best name ever used by a local development firm, which in this case is Newcastle Limited. You know that name form Gild at State and Division. I mean yes, it’s also significant that we get to bulldoze another parking lot while adding another cool tower to the West Loop. But I love Solar Junkyard.

I took a couple photos of the proposed site at 210 North Morgan last week, where (for now) a single-story Maria Pinto store stands next to a surface parking lot. Since this blog is about photos, I needed to be sure I had a photo or two of my own to post, along with a couple of Hartshorne Plunkard’s renderings.. But really, this particular post is about the name “Solar Junkyard.” I wonder if there’s swag I could get. More importantly, where did the name come from?

Rendering of Solar Junkyard’s 210 North Morgan from Hartshorne Plunkard Architects
Rendering of Solar Junkyard’s 210 North Morgan from Hartshorne Plunkard Architects

920 North Wells scores North Union’s first tower crane permit as caissons wrap up

It took <check’s sun dial> less than two weeks for Power Construction and Stalworth Underground to get caissons drilled at 920 North Wells. I’ve left dirty dishes in the sink for longer than that. Regularly. But there’s no time to be wasted on JDL Development’s latest endeavor, the North Union mega project, so it’s out with caisson equipment, and in with the earth movers. They’ve got a foundation to dig out, not just for the building, but also for the tower crane, and Manitowoc MD485 to be precise, which received a foundation permit of its own on Tuesday, May 17.

Since I once again fell asleep on the job, the following gallery includes photos of caisson work taken May 12, and post-caisson work taken May 19.


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